University Wit

Words, Thoughts, Photos and Emotions from a Modern Actor Trapped in an Ancient Art.

cookingwithfriendscomic:

The Complete Works of Chilliam Quakesfeare pt 3/28
Blood’s Flavour’s Lost

Francis, an 800-year-old vampire, has lost the will to live. After eight centuries sucking the blood of the innocent, he just can’t take it anymore. He decides to find someone to help him end his undead existence, but no one knows how to do a proper staking in 2014. In his search for someone to help his suicide, he meets Molly, a misunderstood, quirky 22-year-old with an art history degree, a black cat, and an interest in the occult. Together, they rediscover why life (and death) is worth living.

cookingwithfriendscomic:

The Complete Works of Chilliam Quakesfeare pt 3/28

Blood’s Flavour’s Lost

Francis, an 800-year-old vampire, has lost the will to live. After eight centuries sucking the blood of the innocent, he just can’t take it anymore. He decides to find someone to help him end his undead existence, but no one knows how to do a proper staking in 2014. In his search for someone to help his suicide, he meets Molly, a misunderstood, quirky 22-year-old with an art history degree, a black cat, and an interest in the occult. Together, they rediscover why life (and death) is worth living.

(via shakespeareismyjam)

steadypickingmyfro:

theuppitynegras:

dynastylnoire:

lisawithabee:

spacedmeanssomethingdifferentnow:

sunfell:

darkjez:

djphatrick:

A 13-Year-Old’s Slavery Analogy Raises Some Uncomfortable Truths in School
In a bold comparative analysis of TheNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Jada Williams, a 13-year old eighth grader at School #3 in Rochester, New York, asserted that in her experience, today’s education system is a modern-day version of slavery. According to the Fredrick Douglass Foundation of New York, the schools’ teachers and administrators were so offended by Williams’ essay that they began a campaign of harassment—kicking her out of class and trying to suspend her—that ultimately forced her parents to withdraw her from the school. In her essay, which was written for a contest, Williams reflected on what Douglass heard his slave master, Mr. Auld, telling his wife after catching her teaching Douglass how to read. “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him,” Auld says. “It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”
Williams wrote that overcrowded, poorly managed classrooms prevent real learning from happening and thus produces the same results as Mr. Auld’s outright ban. She wrote that her white teachers—the vast majority of Rochester students are black and Hispanic, but very few teachers are people of color—are in a “position of power to dictate what I can, cannot, and will learn, only desiring that I may get bored because of the inconsistency and the mismanagement of the classroom.”
Read more: Education - GOOD
truth.

I’m so freaking proud of this child.

“The conservative Frederick Douglass Foundation gave Williams a special award, saying that her essay ‘actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography.’ They have also reached out to the school for an explanation of the 13-year-old’s treatment.”


She spoke truth to power.

Good job helping make her argument more solid by kicking her out of class and forcing her parents to take her out of school.




Our babies know!

steadypickingmyfro:

theuppitynegras:

dynastylnoire:

lisawithabee:

spacedmeanssomethingdifferentnow:

sunfell:

darkjez:

djphatrick:

A 13-Year-Old’s Slavery Analogy Raises Some Uncomfortable Truths in School

In a bold comparative analysis of TheNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Jada Williams, a 13-year old eighth grader at School #3 in Rochester, New York, asserted that in her experience, today’s education system is a modern-day version of slavery. According to the Fredrick Douglass Foundation of New York, the schools’ teachers and administrators were so offended by Williams’ essay that they began a campaign of harassmentkicking her out of class and trying to suspend her—that ultimately forced her parents to withdraw her from the school.

In her essay, which was written for a contest, Williams reflected on what Douglass heard his slave master, Mr. Auld, telling his wife after catching her teaching Douglass how to read. “If you teach that nigger (speaking of myself) how to read, there will be no keeping him,” Auld says. “It will forever unfit him to be a slave. He would at once become unmanageable, and of no value to his master.”

Williams wrote that overcrowded, poorly managed classrooms prevent real learning from happening and thus produces the same results as Mr. Auld’s outright ban. She wrote that her white teachers—the vast majority of Rochester students are black and Hispanic, but very few teachers are people of color—are in a “position of power to dictate what I can, cannot, and will learn, only desiring that I may get bored because of the inconsistency and the mismanagement of the classroom.”

Read more: Education - GOOD

truth.

I’m so freaking proud of this child.

“The conservative Frederick Douglass Foundation gave Williams a special award, saying that her essay ‘actually demonstrates that she understood the autobiography.’ They have also reached out to the school for an explanation of the 13-year-old’s treatment.”

She spoke truth to power.

Good job helping make her argument more solid by kicking her out of class and forcing her parents to take her out of school.

Our babies know!

(Source: daughtersofdig, via akaferngully)

Dark Thoughts In Need Of Dark Voice-Overs

hitrecord:

RegularJOE (Director) Featured Comment: "You’re a great writer! This made me laugh, but also had a lot of deeper meanings beneath the humor. I particularly liked the one about the mime, the tooth fairy, the four words, and "I’m not religious". But I think probably any of them could work if a…

You never know when or if you’ll get a big break as a writer. You write and write and write and hope that someone out there will discern what you believe is in that writing, and then you write and hope and wait some more. I think I am having my big break right now. This year I published two books—a novel, An Untamed State, and an essay collection, Bad Feminist. Both books have received positive critical attention. The latter book has been on the New York Times bestseller list twice. Articles about me keep telling me that I am having a moment, my big break. My friends and loved ones tell me that I am having a moment. Part of me recognizes that I am having a moment, while the more relentless part of me, a part that cannot be quieted, is only hungrier, wanting more.

Read the rest of this essay: The Price of Black Ambition | VQR Online (via roxanegay)

(via flavorpill)

Consider that you radiate. At all times. Consider that what you’re feeling right now is rippling outward into a field of is-ness that anyone can dip their oar into. You are felt. You are heard. You are seen. If you were not here, the world would be different. Because of your presence, the universe is expanding.

Danielle LaPorte (via avvfvl)

(Source: hellokatetann, via specialbrownii)

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